Digitalization and Control of Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems

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Digitalization and Control of Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems, Wiley
Concepts, Technologies and Applications
Von Olivier Cardin, William Derigent, Damien Trentesaux, im heise Shop in digitaler Fassung erhältlich
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Industrial cyber-physical systems operate simultaneously in the physical and digital worlds of business and are now a cornerstone of the fourth industrial revolution. Increasingly, these systems are becoming the way forward for academics and industrialists alike. The very essence of these systems, however, is often misunderstood or misinterpreted. This book thus sheds light on the problem areas surrounding cyber-physical systems and provides the reader with the key principles for understanding and illustrating them.

Presented using a pedagogical approach, with numerous examples of applications, this book is the culmination of more than ten years of study by the Intelligent Manufacturing and Services Systems (IMS2) French research group, part of the MACS (Modeling, Analysis and Control of Dynamic Systems) research group at the CNRS. It is intended both for engineers who are interested in emerging industrial developments and for master’s level students wishing to learn about the industrial systems of the future. OLIVIER CARDIN is a lecturer in Industrial Engineering at the IUT de Nantes, Nantes University, France.

WILLIAM DERIGENT is a Professor in Industrial Engineering at the University of Lorraine, France.

DAMIEN TRENTESAUX is a Professor in Industrial Engineering at the Université Polytechnique Hauts-de-France, France.

Foreword xiii

André THOMAS

Introduction xvii

Olivier CARDIN, William DERIGENT and Damien TRENTESAUX

PART 1 CONCEPTUALIZING INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 1

CHAPTER 1 GENERAL CONCEPTS 3

Olivier CARDIN and Damien TRENTESAUX

1.1 Industry at the heart of society 3

1.2 Industrial world in search of a new model 4

1.3 Cyber-physical systems 6

1.4 From cyber-physical systems to industrial cyber-physical systems 8

1.5 Perspectives on the study of industrial cyber-physical systems 11

1.6 References 15

CHAPTER 2 MOVING TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE MODEL: SOCIETAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL 17

Patrick MARTIN, Maroua NOUIRI and Ali SIADAT

2.1 Industry of the future and sustainable development 17

2.2 Contribution of ICPS to the social dimension 18

2.2.1 Background 18

2.2.2 Cognitive aspects 21

2.2.3 Health and safety aspects at work 22

2.3 Contribution of ICPS to the environmental dimension 28

2.3.1 Objectives and expectations 28

2.3.2 Example of application 29

2.4 Contribution of ICPS to the economic dimension 30

2.5 Conclusion 32

2.6 References 32

PART 2 SENSING AND DISTRIBUTING INFORMATION WITHIN INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 37

CHAPTER 3 INFORMATION FLOW IN INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 39

Thierry BERGER and Yves SALLEZ

3.1 Introduction 39

3.2 Information and decision loops when using an ICPS 39

3.3 Decision-making processes within the loops of an ICPS 41

3.3.1 Nature of decision-making processes 41

3.3.2 Nature of information 42

3.3.3 Approach to studying the informational loops of the cyber part of an ICPS 43

3.4 Elements for the implementation of loops 45

3.4.1 Generic architecture 45

3.4.2 Link to decision-making processes and the nature of the information 48

3.5 Illustrative examples 48

3.5.1 Example from rail transport 49

3.5.2 Example from the manufacturing sector 50

3.6 Conclusion 52

3.7 References 52

CHAPTER 4 THE INTELLIGENT PRODUCT CONCEPT 55

William DERIGENT

4.1 The intelligent product, a leading-edge concept in industrial cyber-physical systems 55

4.2 Definitions of the intelligent product concept 56

4.3 Developments in the concept of intelligent products 59

4.3.1 Group 1: product-driven systems (PDS) 61

4.3.2 Group 2: product lifecycle information management (PLIM) 63

4.4 Conclusions and perspectives on the intelligent product 66

4.5 References 67

PART 3 DIGITALIZING AT THE SERVICE OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 71

CHAPTER 5 VIRTUALIZING RESOURCES, PRODUCTS AND THE INFORMATION SYSTEM 73

Theodor BORANGIU, Silviu RĂILEANU and Octavian MORARIU

5.1 Virtualization – the technology for industrial cyber-physical systems 73

5.2 Virtualization in the industrial environment 74

5.3 Shop floor virtualization of resource and product workloads 78

5.3.1 Resource and product virtualization through shop floor profiles 78

5.3.2 Virtualization of collaborative product and resource workloads 83

5.4 MES virtualization in the cloud (vMES) 89

5.5 Perspectives offered by virtualization to industry of the future 94

5.6 References 95

CHAPTER 6 CYBERSECURITY OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 97

Antoine GALLAIS and Youcef IMINE

6.1 What are the risks involved? 98

6.1.1 Unavailability of systems 98

6.1.2 Loss of confidentiality or integrity 101

6.1.3 Bypassing access and authentication controls 104

6.2 What means of protection? 105

6.2.1 Ensuring availability 105

6.2.2 Ensuring confidentiality 107

6.2.3 Implementing authentication mechanisms 108

6.2.4 Controlling access, permissions and logging 109

6.3 Conclusion 112

6.4 References 114

PART 4 CONTROLLING INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS117

CHAPTER 7 INDUSTRIAL AGENTS: FROM THE HOLONIC PARADIGM TO INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 119

Paulo LEITÃO, Stamatis KARNOUSKOS and Armando Walter COLOMBO

7.1 Overview of multi-agent systems and holonics 120

7.1.1 Multi-agent systems 120

7.1.2 Holonic paradigm 122

7.2 Industrial agents 124

7.2.1 Definition and characteristics 124

7.2.2 Interfacing with physical assets 126

7.3 Industrial agents for realizing industrial cyber-physical systems 127

7.3.1 Supporting the development of intelligent products, machines and systems within cyber-physical systems 127

7.3.2 Implementing an industrial multi-agent system as ICPS 129

7.4 Discussion and future directions 130

7.5 References 131

CHAPTER 8 HOLONIC CONTROL ARCHITECTURES 135

Olivier CARDIN, William DERIGENT and Damien TRENTESAUX

8.1 Introduction 135

8.2 HCA fundamentals 136

8.3 HCAs in the physical part of ICPS 137

8.4 Dynamic architectures, towards a reconfiguration of the physical part from the cyber part of ICPS 140

8.5 HCAs and Big Data 143

8.6 HCAs and digital twin: towards the digitization of architectures 144

8.7 References 145

PART 5 LEARNING AND INTERACTING WITH INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 149

CHAPTER 9 BIG DATA ANALYTICS AND MACHINE LEARNING FOR INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 151

Yasamin ESLAMI, Mario LEZOCHE and Philippe THOMAS

9.1 Introduction 151

9.2 Data massification in industrial cyber-physical systems 153

9.3 Big Data and multi-relational data mining (MRDM) 154

9.3.1 Formal concept analysis (FCA) 154

9.3.2 Relational concept analysis (RCA) 157

9.4 Machine learning 160

9.4.1 Basics of machine learning 160

9.4.2 Multilayer perceptron (MLP) 160

9.5 Illustrative example 165

9.6 Conclusion 167

9.7 References 167

CHAPTER 10 HUMAN–INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEM INTEGRATION: DESIGN AND EVALUATION METHODS 171

Marie-Pierre PACAUX-LEMOINE and Frank FLEMISCH

10.1 Introduction 171

10.2 Design methods 175

10.3 Method of integrating HICPS 176

10.3.1 Descending phase 177

10.3.2 Ascending phase 180

10.4 Summary and conclusion 185

10.5 References 186

PART 6 TRANSFORMING INDUSTRIES WITH INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 189

CHAPTER 11 IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ON RECONFIGURABLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS 191

Catherine DA CUNHA and Nathalie KLEMENT

11.1 Context 191

11.1.1 Developments 192

11.1.2 Issues 193

11.1.3 Resources 193

11.2 Reconfiguration 194

11.2.1 Implementation and decision levels 194

11.2.2 Information systems 195

11.2.3 Adaptation in the context of CPPS/RMS 196

11.2.4 Where and when to reconfigure? 197

11.3 Modeling 197

11.3.1 Data collection 198

11.3.2 Simulation platforms 199

11.4 Ergonomics/cognitive aspects 200

11.5 Operation of the information system 201

11.5.1 Operational level: procurement 201

11.5.2 Responding to disruptions 202

11.5.3 Decision support 203

11.6 Illustrative example 203

11.7 References 205

CHAPTER 12 IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ON GLOBAL AND INTERCONNECTED LOGISTICS 207

Shenle PAN, Mariam LAFKIHI and Eric BALLOT

12.1 Logistics and its challenges 207

12.2 Contemporary logistics systems and organizations 208

12.2.1 Intra-site logistics 209

12.2.2 Intra-urban logistics 210

12.2.3 Inter-site inter-city logistics 211

12.3 The Physical Internet as a modern and promising logistics organization 212

12.3.1 Concept and definition 212

12.3.2 Topologies of networks of networks 213

12.4 Perspectives of ICPS applications in interconnected logistics: the example of the Physical Internet 215

12.4.1 Modeling the Physical Internet by ICPS: the example of routing 216

12.4.2 Exploiting ICPS: the data-driven approach and the digital twin-driven approach 219

12.5 Conclusion 221

12.6 References 222

CHAPTER 13 IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ON TRANSPORTATION 225

John MBULI and Damien TRENTESAUX

13.1 Introduction 225

13.1.1 Pull forces 226

13.1.2 Complexity factors of the transportation sector 227

13.1.3 Push forces 228

13.2 The impact of ICPS on transportation 229

13.3 Rail transportation service: an illustrative example 231

13.3.1 The physical space of SUPERFLO 233

13.3.2 The human fleet supervisor 235

13.3.3 The cyber space of SUPERFLO 236

13.3.4 Evaluation of the proposed model and industrial expectations 236

13.4 Concluding remarks 238

13.5 Acknowledgments 239

13.6 References 239

CHAPTER 14 IMPACTS OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ON THE BUILDING TRADES 243

William DERIGENT and Laurent JOBLOT

14.1 General introduction 243

14.2 The place of BIM in Construction 4.0 245

14.3 Examples of transformations in the construction sector 247

14.3.1 Control: real-time site management 248

14.3.2 Learning and interacting: virtual reality and machine learning 249

14.3.3 Capturing and distributing: use of wireless technologies (RFID and WSN) 251

14.3.4 Digitalizing: digitalizing technologies for BIM 252

14.4 Example of ICPS in construction 254

14.5 Achieving the digital transformation of businesses 255

14.6 References 257

CHAPTER 15 IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS ON THE HEALTH SYSTEM 261

Franck FONTANILI and Maria DI MASCOLO

15.1 Introduction 261

15.1.1 The health system and its specificities 261

15.1.2 The digital evolution of healthcare production and health 263

15.2 HCPS in the literature 263

15.2.1 HCPS for medical monitoring 266

15.2.2 HCPS for well-being and prevention 266

15.2.3 HCPS for organizational monitoring of patient pathways 267

15.2.4 Sensors for monitoring patients and resources 268

15.3 The contribution of a digital twin in an HCPS 270

15.3.1 General principle of digital twins in health 270

15.3.2 A proposal for an HCPS based on a digital twin of patient pathways in the hospital 271

15.4 Conclusion 274

15.5 References 275

PART 7 ENVISIONING THE INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS OF THE FUTURE 279

CHAPTER 16 ETHICS AND RESPONSIBILITY OF INDUSTRIAL CYBER-PHYSICAL SYSTEMS 281

Sylvie JONAS and Françoise LAMNABHI-LAGARRIGUE

16.1 Introduction 281

16.2 Ethics and ICPS 283

16.2.1 Data management and protection 284

16.2.2 Control in the design of algorithms 285

16.3 Liability and ICPS 288

16.3.1 Existing liability regimes applied to ICPS 289

16.3.2 Proposals for changes in liability regimes 291

16.4 References 294

CHAPTER 17 TEACHING AND LEARNING ICPS: LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES 297

Bilal AHMAD, Freeha AZMAT, Armando Walter COLOMBO and Gerrit JAN VELTINK

17.1 Introduction 297

17.2 University of Warwick – Bachelor-level curriculum 299

17.2.1 ICPS education: Fusion of computer science and engineering 300

17.2.2 Key enabling technologies in the ICPS curriculum 301

17.2.3 Pedagogical principles: teaching ICPS modules 301

17.3 University of Applied Sciences Emden/Leer – master’s-level curriculum 302

17.3.1 ICPS education: fusion of computer science, electrical and mechatronics engineering 303

17.3.2 Key enabling technologies in the ICPS curriculum 305

17.3.3 Pedagogical principles: teaching ICPS modules 307

17.4 Conclusion 308

17.5 References 309

Conclusion 313

William DERIGENT, Olivier CARDIN and Damien TRENTESAUX

List of Authors 317

Index 321
Artikel-Details
Anbieter:
Wiley
Autor:
Damien Trentesaux, Olivier Cardin, William Derigent
Artikelnummer:
9781119987406
Veröffentlicht:
31.05.2022
Seitenanzahl:
352

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