Software Defined Networks

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Software Defined Networks, Wiley
Architecture and Applications
Von Anand Nayyar, Preeti Nagrath, Bhawna Singla, im heise Shop in digitaler Fassung erhältlich
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SOFTWARE DEFINED NETWORKS

SOFTWARE DEFINED NETWORKING SUGGESTS AN ALTERNATIVE WORLDVIEW, ONE THAT COMES WITH A NEW SOFTWARE STACK TO WHICH THIS BOOK IS ORGANIZED, WITH THE GOAL OF PRESENTING A TOP-TO-BOTTOM TOUR OF SDN WITHOUT LEAVING ANY SIGNIFICANT GAPS THAT THE READER MIGHT SUSPECT CAN ONLY BE FILLED WITH MAGIC OR PROPRIETARY CODE.Software defined networking (SDN) is an architecture designed to make a network more flexible and easier to manage. SDN has been widely adopted across data centers, WANs, and access networks and serves as a foundational element of a comprehensive intent-based networking (IBN) architecture. Although SDN has so far been limited to automated provisioning and configuration, IBN now adds “translation” and “assurance” so that the complete network cycle can be automated, continuously aligning the network to business needs. In 14 chapters, this book provides a comprehensive understanding of an SDN-based network as a scalable distributed system running on commodity hardware. The reader will have a one-stop reference looking into the applications, architectures, functionalities, virtualization, security, and privacy challenges connected to SDN. AUDIENCE

Researchers in software, IT, and electronic engineering as well as industry engineers and technologists working in areas such as network virtualization, Python network programming, CISCO ACI, software defined network, and cloud computing. ANAND NAYYAR, PHD, received his PhD in Computer Science from Desh Bhagat University in 2017 and is currently an assistant professor, Vice-Chairman (Research) and Director (IoT and Intelligent Systems Lab) in the School of Computer Science, Duy Tan University, Da Nang, Vietnam. A Certified Professional with 100+ Professional certificates from CISCO, Microsoft, Oracle, Google, Beingcert, EXIN, GAQM, Cyberoam, and many more, he has published more than 150 research articles and ISI journals, edited 30+ books, and has 60 patents to his credit.

BHAWNA SINGLA, PHD, received her PhD from Thapar University, Patiala, India and is currently a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department, PIET College of Engineering and Technology, Samalkha, Panipat, India. She has more than 18 years of academic experience and has published more than 35 research papers in international journals/conferences and edited books. PREETI NAGRATH, PHD, is an associate professor in Bharati Vidyapeeth’s College of Engineering. She has more than 16 years of academic experience and has published more than 60 research papers in SCI-indexed journals. Preface xxi

1 INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE DEFINED NETWORKING 1

Subhra Priyadarshini Biswal and Sanjeev Patel

1.1 Introduction 2

1.2 Terminology and Architecture 5

1.2.1 Infrastructure Layer 9

1.2.2 Southbound Interfaces Layer 11

1.2.3 Network Hypervisors Layer 11

1.2.4 Controller Layer 12

1.2.5 Northbound Interfaces 13

1.3 The Role of Network Operating Systems 14

1.4 SDN Versus NFV 16

1.5 The Role of NFV into SDN-Based IoT Systems 17

1.6 Challenges and Future Directions 19

1.7 Applications of SDN in IT Industries 21

1.8 Conclusion and Future Scope 23

References 24

2 SOFTWARE-DEFINED NETWORKS: PERSPECTIVES AND APPLICATIONS 29

Inderjeet Kaur, Anupama Sharma, Amita Agnihotri and Charu Agarwal

2.1 Introduction 30

2.2 SDN Architecture 32

2.2.1 Key Takeaways of SDN Architecture 35

2.2.2 Open Flow 36

2.3 Functionalities of SDN 39

2.3.1 SDN Benefits 40

2.4 SDN vs. Traditional Hardware-Based Network 41

2.5 Load Balancing in SDN 44

2.5.1 SDN-Based Load Balancer in Cloud Computing 47

2.5.2 SDN Without Cloud Computing 49

2.6 SDN Security 49

2.6.1 Security Threats and Attacks 51

2.7 SDN Applications 53

2.8 Research Directions 55

2.9 Conclusion 55

References 56

3 SOFTWARE-DEFINED NETWORKS AND ITS APPLICATIONS 63

Rajender Kumar, Alankrita Aggarwal, Karun Handa, Punit Soni and Mukesh Kumar

3.1 Introduction 64

3.2 SDN vs Traditional Networks 65

3.3 SDN Working: A Functional Overview 67

3.4 Components and Implementation Architecture 68

3.4.1 Components of an SDN 68

3.4.1.1 SDN Application 68

3.4.1.2 SDN Controller 69

3.4.1.3 SDN Datapath 69

3.4.1.4 SDN Control to Data-Plane Interface (CDPI) 69

3.4.1.5 SDN Northbound Interfaces (NBI) 69

3.4.1.6 SDN Control Plane: Incorporated-Hierarchical-Distributed 69

3.4.1.7 Controller Placement 70

3.4.1.8 OpenFlow and Open Source in SDN Architecture 70

3.4.2 SDN Design 70

3.4.2.1 Northward APIs 71

3.4.2.2 Southward APIs 71

3.4.2.3 Orchestrator 71

3.4.2.4 Controller 71

3.4.2.5 Compute 71

3.5 Implementation Architecture 72

3.6 Pros and Cons of SDN 72

3.6.1 SDN Misconceptions 73

3.6.2 Pros of SDN 73

3.6.2.1 Centralized Network Provisioning 73

3.6.2.2 Holistic Enterprise Management 73

3.6.2.3 More Granular Security 74

3.6.2.4 Lower Operating Costs 74

3.6.2.5 Hardware-Savings and Reduced Capital Expenditures 74

3.6.2.6 Cloud Abstraction 75

3.6.2.7 Guaranteed Content Delivery 75

3.6.3 Cons of SDN 75

3.6.3.1 Latency 75

3.6.3.2 Maintenance 75

3.6.3.3 Complexity 75

3.6.3.4 Configuration 76

3.6.3.5 Device Security 76

3.7 SDN Applications 76

3.7.1 SDN Environment for Applications 76

3.7.1.1 Internal SDN Applications 77

3.7.1.2 External SDN Applications 77

3.7.1.3 Security Services 77

3.7.1.4 Network Monitoring and Intelligence 77

3.7.1.5 Data Transmission Management 78

3.7.1.6 Content Availability 78

3.7.1.7 Guideline and Compliance-Bound Applications 78

3.7.1.8 Elite Applications 79

3.7.1.9 Circulated Application Control and Cloud Integration 79

3.7.2 Common Application of SDN in Enterprise Networks 79

3.7.2.1 Further Developed Security 80

3.7.2.2 Diminished Working Expenses 80

3.7.2.3 A Superior Client Experience 81

3.7.3 SDN Drives in the Enterprise 81

3.7.3.1 Bringing Together and Improving on the Administration Plane 81

3.7.3.2 Accomplishing Programmability of the Control Plane 81

3.7.3.3 Simple Client Onboarding 82

3.7.3.4 Simple Endpoint Security 82

3.7.3.5 Simple Traffic Checking 82

3.7.3.6 SES Client Onboarding 83

3.7.3.7 Client Onboarding 83

3.7.3.8 SES Simple Endpoint Security: Distinguishing Dubious Traffic 83

3.7.3.9 SES Simple Traffic Observing 84

3.7.3.10 Synopsis 84

3.7.4 SDN Stream Sending (SDN) 84

3.7.4.1 Proactive Versus Reactive Versus Hybrid 84

3.7.4.2 DMN 85

3.7.4.3 SD-WAN 85

3.7.4.4 SD-LAN 85

3.7.4.5 Security Using the SDN Worldview 85

3.7.5 Security Utilizing the SDN Paradigm 86

3.7.6 Gathering Data Delivery Using SDN 87

3.7.7 Relationship of SDN to NFV 87

3.8 Future Research Directions of SDN 88

3.9 Conclusion & Future Scope 89

References 90

4 LATENCY-BASED ROUTING FOR SDN-OPENFLOW NETWORKS 97

Hima Bindu Valiveti, Meenakshi K, Swaraja K, Jagannadha Swamy Tata, Chaitanya Duggineni, Swetha Namburu and Sri Indrani Kotamraju

4.1 Introduction to Generations of Networks 98

4.2 Features of 5G Systems 99

4.3 Software-Defined Networking (SDN) 102

4.4 Proposed Work 105

4.4.1 Path Selection Algorithm 106

4.4.2 Optimized Path Selection 106

4.4.2.1 Forwarding Node Selection 106

4.4.2.2 Priority Scheduling 108

4.4.2.3 Priority Classification 108

4.5 Experimentation and Results 109

4.5.1 Implementation of Traffic Streaming 109

4.6 Performance Analysis 113

4.7 Conclusion and Future Scope 116

References 116

5 QOS IMPROVEMENT EVALUATION WITH AN EFFECTIVE SWITCH ASSIGNMENT TO THE CONTROLLER IN REAL-TIME SDN ENVIRONMENT 119

Jehad Ali and Byeong-hee Roh

5.1 Introduction 120

5.1.1 Objectives 121

5.2 Architecture of SDN 121

5.2.1 Data Plane 123

5.2.2 Southbound (SB) APIs 123

5.2.3 NB API 124

5.2.4 Management Plane 125

5.2.5 Control Plane 125

5.3 Controller Placement Effect on the QoS 125

5.4 Communication between the Control and Data Planes 126

5.5 Related Works 128

5.6 Parameters for Computing E2E Delay 129

5.6.1 Path Discovery Delay (PD) 129

5.6.2 Actual Delay (AD) 129

5.7 Clustering Based on the Latency of the Emulated Mininet Network 130

5.8 Results and Discussion 131

5.9 Conclusion and Future Directions 133

References 134

6 AN INSIGHT INTO TRAFFIC ENGINEERING IN SOFTWARE-DEFINED NETWORKS 137

Prabu U. and Geetha V.

6.1 Introduction 138

6.2 Related Works 142

6.3 Review on Traffic Engineering Techniques in SDN 145

6.4 Review on Traffic Engineering Techniques in Hybrid SDN 163

6.5 Review on Traffic Matrix Estimation and Measurement Techniques in SDN 169

6.6 Analysis and Research Direction 177

6.7 Conclusion and Future Scope 179

References 179

7 NETWORK FUNCTIONS VIRTUALIZATION AND SDN 191

Priyanka Kujur and Sanjeev Patel

7.1 Introduction 192

7.2 Types of Virtualizations 194

7.2.1 Server Virtualization 194

7.2.2 Network Virtualization 195

7.2.3 Application Virtualization 195

7.2.4 Desktop Virtualization 197

7.2.5 Storage Virtualization 197

7.3 Wireless Network Virtualization 198

7.3.1 Radio Spectrum Resources 198

7.3.2 Wireless Network Infrastructure 199

7.3.3 Wireless Virtual Resources 200

7.3.3.1 Spectrum-Level Slicing 200

7.3.3.2 Infrastructure-Level Slicing 200

7.3.3.3 Network-Level Slicing 200

7.3.3.4 Flow-Level Slicing 200

7.3.4 Wireless Virtualization Controller 201

7.4 Network Functions Virtualization and Software-Defined Network 201

7.4.1 Network Virtualization 201

7.4.2 Network Functions Virtualization 201

7.4.2.1 Network Functions Virtualization Infrastructure 202

7.4.2.2 Virtual Network Functions 203

7.4.2.3 Network Functions Virtualization Management and Orchestration 203

7.4.2.4 NFV Challenges 204

7.4.3 Benefits of NFV 204

7.4.3.1 Coexistence of Dissimilar Network 204

7.4.3.2 Encouraging Network Innovation 204

7.4.3.3 Deployment of Agile Network Capabilities 204

7.4.3.4 Provisioning of Independent and Diverse Networks 205

7.4.3.5 Resource Optimization 205

7.4.3.6 Deployment of Distinct Network Services 205

7.4.4 Software-Defined Networking (SDN) 205

7.4.4.1 Traditional Networks 205

7.4.4.2 Need for New Network Architecture 206

7.4.4.3 Introduction to SDN 206

7.4.4.4 SDN Implementation 208

7.4.4.5 SDN Design 208

7.4.4.6 SDN Operation 209

7.4.5 Open Flow 210

7.4.5.1 Open Flow Architecture 211

7.4.5.2 Defining Flow in Open Flow 212

7.4.5.3 Flow and Group Table 213

7.4.6 SDN Benefits 214

7.4.6.1 Centralized Network 214

7.4.6.2 Programmability of the Network 214

7.4.6.3 Rise of Virtualization 214

7.4.6.4 Lower Operating Cost 215

7.4.6.5 Device Configuration and Troubleshooting 215

7.4.7 SDN Challenges 215

7.4.7.1 Reliability 215

7.4.7.2 Scalability 215

7.4.7.3 Performance Under Latency Constraints 216

7.4.7.4 Use of Low-Level Interface Between the Controller and the Network Device 216

7.4.7.5 Controller Placement Problem 216

7.4.7.6 Security 217

7.4.8 SDN versus Traditional Network 217

7.4.9 Network Function Virtualization versus SDN 218

7.5 SDN Architecture 219

7.5.1 Data Plane 219

7.5.2 Control Plane 220

7.5.3 Application Layer 220

7.6 Software-Defined Networking Application 220

7.6.1 Adaptive Routing 220

7.6.2 Load Balancing 221

7.6.3 Boundless Roaming 221

7.6.4 Network Maintenance 222

7.6.5 Network Security 222

7.6.6 SDN for Cloud Computing 222

7.6.7 Internet of Things 224

7.7 Conclusion and Future Scope 224

References 225

8 SDN-ENABLED NETWORK VIRTUALIZATION AND ITS APPLICATIONS 231

Anil Kumar Rangsietti and Siva Sairam Prasad Kodali

8.1 Introduction 232

8.2 Traditional Cloud Data Centers 234

8.2.1 SDN for Enabling Innovative Traffic Engineering Tasks in Cloud Data Centers 236

8.2.1.1 Optimal Routing Mechanisms 236

8.2.1.2 Flexible Traffic Steering During Network Failure Recovery 238

8.2.1.3 Improved Topology Management Mechanisms 238

8.2.1.4 Innovative Traffic Analysis and Monitoring Mechanisms 239

8.2.1.5 General Challenges in Adopting SDN 239

8.2.2 SDN Role in Flexible Network Virtualization 241

8.2.2.1 Sharing of Physical Infrastructure and Enforcing Multiple Customer Policies 242

8.2.2.2 Strict Customer Policies Enforcement and Service Level Agreements (SLA) Guarantee 243

8.2.2.3 Failures of Devices or Links 243

8.2.2.4 Optimal Utilization of Cloud Resources 244

8.3 Importance of SDN in Network Function Virtualization (NFV) 245

8.3.1 Network Service Chaining (NSC) 248

8.3.2 Importance of NFs Placement in a Cloud Environment 249

8.3.3 Importance of NF Placement and Scaling in NSC 251

8.4 SDN and Network Virtualization Role in Evolution of Next-Generation Wi-Fi and Mobile Networks 253

8.4.1 Software-Defined Solutions for Enterprise Wireless LANs (WLANs) 253

8.4.1.1 Software-Defined APs 254

8.4.1.2 SDN Switches and Controller 256

8.4.2 Software-Defined Mobile Networks and Telecommunication Clouds 258

8.4.3 Necessity and Importance of Telecommunication Clouds 259

8.4.3.1 SDN- and NFV-Enabled Cloud Environments 260

8.4.3.2 Lightweight Virtualization Technologies 261

8.4.3.3 Novel Application Architecture, Such as Cloud Native Applications and Microservices 263

8.5 SDN and NFV Role in 5G and Smart Cities 264

8.5.1 SDN and NFV Role in Designing Deployment Environment for IoT Applications 265

8.5.2 Cloud-Fog-Edge Computing Environments 266

8.5.3 SDN- and NFV-Enabled 5G and Network Slicing Deployment 269

8.6 Conclusions and Future Scope 271

References 272

9 SOFTWARE-DEFINED NETWORKING: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS AND POTENTIAL SYNERGIES 279

Jasminder Kaur Sandhu, Bhawna Singla, Meena Pundir, Sanjeev Rao and Anil Kumar Verma

9.1 Introduction 280

9.2 Characteristics of Software-Defined Networking 282

9.2.1 Open Standards and Vendor Neutral 282

9.2.2 Centrally Managed 283

9.2.3 Decoupled 283

9.2.4 Dynamic/Agile 283

9.2.5 Flow-Based Management 283

9.2.6 Programmable 283

9.3 Applications of Software-Defined Networking 284

9.3.1 Specific Purposes 284

9.3.1.1 Network Management 284

9.3.1.2 Middle-Box 284

9.3.2 Security 285

9.3.3 Networks 285

9.3.3.1 Optical Network 286

9.3.3.2 Home Network 286

9.3.3.3 Wireless Network 286

9.4 Security Issues in Software-Defined Networking 287

9.4.1 Authentication and Authorization 287

9.4.2 Access Control and Accountability 288

9.4.3 Threats from Applications 289

9.4.4 Threats Due to Scalability 289

9.4.5 Denial of Service (DoS) Attacks 290

9.4.6 Challenges in Distributed Control Plane 290

9.5 Potential Attacks in Software-Defined Networking 291

9.5.1 Spoofing 291

9.5.2 ARP Spoofing 291

9.5.2.1 IP Spoofing 293

9.5.3 Tampering 293

9.5.4 Repudiation 294

9.5.5 Information Disclosure 295

9.5.6 DoS 295

9.5.7 Elevation of Privilege 296

9.6 Solutions to Security Issues and Attacks in Software-Defined Networking 297

9.6.1 Spoofing 297

9.6.1.1 ARP Spoofing 297

9.6.1.2 IP Spoofing 301

9.6.2 Tampering 301

9.6.3 Repudiation 301

9.6.3.1 Nonrepudiation Verification 301

9.6.3.2 Accountability 302

9.6.4 Information Disclosure 302

9.6.4.1 Scanning-Based Solutions 302

9.6.4.2 Information Disclosure Countermeasure 302

9.6.5 Denial of Service (DoS) 302

9.6.6 Elevation of Privilege 303

9.7 Software-Defined Networking Framework 303

9.7.1 Global Flow Table 304

9.7.2 VNGuard 304

9.8 Security Enhancement Using the Software-Defined Networking Framework 305

9.8.1 SDN Firewall 305

9.8.2 Access Control 307

9.8.3 Intrusion Detection System/Intrusion Prevention System (IDS/IPS) 307

9.8.4 SDN Policies 307

9.8.5 Monitoring and Auditing 308

9.8.6 Privacy Protection 308

9.8.7 SDN WiFi Networks 308

9.8.8 Mobile SDN 309

9.8.9 BYOD 309

9.8.10 SDN Open Labs 309

9.9 Open Challenge 310

9.9.1 Interaction Between Different Controllers and Switches 310

9.9.2 Controller Security 310

9.9.3 Managing Heterogenous Controllers 310

9.9.4 Standard Protocol for Controller 311

9.9.5 Standard Protocol Between Control and Management Plane 311

9.9.6 Managing the Load Between Controllers 311

9.10 Recommended Best Practices 311

9.10.1 Authentication 312

9.10.2 Access Control 312

9.10.3 Data Confidentiality 312

9.10.4 Nonrepudiation 312

9.10.5 Data Integrity 313

9.10.6 Communication Security 313

9.10.7 Privacy 313

9.10.8 Availability 313

9.11 Conclusion and Future Scope 314

References 315

10 SECURITY CHALLENGES AND ANALYSIS FOR SDN-BASED NETWORKS 321

Priyanka Kujur, Subhra Priyadarshini Biswal and Sanjeev Patel

10.1 Introduction 322

10.2 Threat Model 325

10.2.1 Spoofing 325

10.2.2 Tampering 325

10.2.3 Repudiation 325

10.2.4 Information Disclosure 325

10.2.5 Denial of Service 326

10.2.6 Elevation of Privileges 326

10.2.7 Threats in SDN Networks 326

10.2.7.1 Attack Surface in SDN 326

10.2.7.2 Security Issues in SDN 327

10.2.7.3 Addressing SDN Security Matters 328

10.2.7.4 Attack to the SDN Architecture 328

10.2.8 Policy-Based SDN Security Architecture 330

10.3 Control Plane Security of SDN 331

10.3.1 Application Coexistence 331

10.3.2 Flow Constraints vs. Flow Circuits 332

10.3.3 An Application Permission Model 332

10.3.4 Application Accountability 332

10.3.5 Toward a Security-Enhanced Control Layer 332

10.4 Security Analysis 332

10.5 Network-Wide Security in SDN 333

10.5.1 Security Systems Development 334

10.5.2 Flow Sampling 335

10.5.3 Traffic Monitoring 336

10.5.4 Access Control 337

10.5.5 Content Inspection 337

10.5.6 Network Resilience 338

10.5.7 Security Middle Boxes 339

10.5.8 Security Challenges in SDN 339

10.6 SDN-Based Virtual and Cloud Networks Security 340

10.6.1 Virtual Networks Security 340

10.6.2 Cloud Networks Security 340

10.7 SDN-Based Secure IoT Frameworks 341

10.8 Conclusion and Future Scope 341

References 342

11 A NOVEL SECURE SDN ARCHITECTURE FOR RELIABLE DATA TRANSMISSION IN 5G NETWORKS 347

J. Sathiamoorthy, Usha M. and R. Bhagavath Nishant

11.1 Introduction 348

11.1.1 Organization of the Chapter 352

11.2 Related Work 352

11.3 SDN-5G Networks—What Does the Future Hold? 356

11.4 Layers in SDN-5G Networks 358

11.5 Security Threats 359

11.5.1 Control Plane 360

11.5.2 Data Plane 361

11.5.3 Application Plane 361

11.6 SDN-5G Networks—Possible Attacks and Threats 362

11.6.1 Distributed Denial of Services (DDoS) 362

11.6.2 Solution for DDoS—To Analyze User’s Behavior via Detection Through Entropy 363

11.6.3 Solution for Packet Sniffing 363

11.6.4 Steps in the Handshake Process 364

11.6.5 ARP Spoofing Attack 365

11.6.5.1 ARP Authentication 365

11.6.5.2 Operating System Patching 365

11.6.5.3 API Exploitation 366

11.6.5.4 Password Guessing or Brute Force 366

11. 7 Proposed Methodology 367

11.7.1 Strong Security Architecture for SDN-Based 5G Networks 367

11.8 Security Analysis 373

11.8.1 IP Spoofing 373

11.8.2 MITM Attack 379

11.8.3 Replay Attack 379

11.9 Conclusion and Future Scope 388

References 388

12 SECURITY AND PRIVACY ISSUES IN 5G/6G-ASSISTED SOFTWARE-DEFINED NETWORKS 391

Durbadal Chattaraj and Ashok Kumar Das

12.1 Introduction 392

12.1.1 SDN Applications 394

12.1.2 Security and Privacy Issues in SDN 396

12.1.3 Chapter Contributions 397

12.1.4 Chapter Organization 397

12.2 Security and Functionality Requirements in SDN 398

12.3 Network and Threat Models 399

12.3.1 Network Model 399

12.3.2 Adversary Model 402

12.4 Taxonomy of Security Protocols in SDN 405

12.5 Security Solutions in SDN 406

12.5.1 Authentication 407

12.5.2 Access Control 408

12.5.3 Key Management 409

12.5.4 Intrusion Detection 410

12.5.5 Blockchain-Based Security Solution 412

12.6 Comparative Analysis 413

12.6.1 Comparative Analysis on Communication and Computational Costs 414

12.6.2 Comparative Analysis on Security Features 415

12.7 Conclusion and Future Scopes 419

References 420

13 EVOLVING REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION OF SDN AND IOT IN THE CONTEXT OF INDUSTRY 4.0, BLOCKCHAIN AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 427

Sunil Kr. Singh, Sunil Kr Sharma, Dipesh Singla and Shabeg Singh Gill

13.1 Introduction 428

13.2 Objectives of the Chapter 430

13.3 Organization of the Chapter 431

13.4 Software-Defined Network Architecture 431

13.4.1 SDN Planes 434

13.4.1.1 Control Plane 434

13.4.1.2 Data Plane 434

13.4.1.3 Application/Management Plane 435

13.4.2 QoS: Quality of Service 436

13.4.2.1 Jitter 436

13.4.2.2 Packet Loss 436

13.4.2.3 Bandwidth 437

13.4.2.4 Latency 437

13.4.3 OpenQoS 437

13.4.4 Secondnet 438

13.4.5 OpenQFlow 440

13.4.6 CloudNaaS 441

13.4.7 Scalable QoS and Automated Control for Network Convergence 442

13.5 Security 442

13.5.1 Fresco 442

13.5.2 NetFuse 443

13.5.3 Scalability 444

13.5.4 DIFANE 444

13.5.5 DevoFlow 445

13.5.6 Maestro 445

13.5.7 Load Balancing 446

13.5.8 AsterX 446

13.5.9 OpenFlow-Based Server Load Balancing Gone Wild 447

13.6 Software-Defined Network (SDN) With IoT 447

13.7 SDN-Based IoT Architecture 448

13.7.1 IoT’s Architecture With Software Programming Functions 449

13.7.2 SDN Controllers 449

13.7.3 Gateways/Routers 451

13.7.4 Sinks 452

13.7.5 Data Center 452

13.7.6 Design Principles 453

13.7.7 Dynamic Deployment of Security Policies 454

13.8 Role of SDN and IoT in Industry 4.0 456

13.8.1 Industry 4.0 Explained 457

13.8.1.1 Mass Customization 457

13.8.1.2 Flexibility 457

13.8.1.3 Additive Manufacturing 457

13.8.1.4 Better Decision Making 458

13.8.1.5 Simulation and Digital Twins 458

13.8.1.6 Integrated Supply Chain 458

13.8.1.7 Energy Management 458

13.8.1.8 Creating Value from Big Data 459

13.8.1.9 Cyber-Physical Systems 459

13.8.2 Brokerage Services 462

13.8.3 Man4Ware 464

13.8.4 Security 466

13.8.5 Additional Advanced Service Alternatives 467

13.8.6 Interconnection and Integration Between IoT and Industry 4.0 467

13.9 Work in Related Domains of IoT 468

13.10 IoT Computing and Management With SDN 470

13.10.1 Edge Computing 470

13.10.2 Convergence of NFV and Edge Computing 471

13.10.3 Use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Software-Defined Networks (SDN) 472

13.10.4 SDN Network Structure and OpenFlow (OF) Protocol 473

13.11 Scope of Blockchain to Secure IoT Using SDN 474

13.11.1 The Architecture of Blockchain-Based SDN 475

13.11.2 Workflow of BC-SDN and Smart Contracts 477

13.11.2.1 Key Components of Workflow 478

13.12 SDN in Various Emerging Areas of IoT 481

13.13 Conclusion and Future Scope 486

References 489

14 SDN-BASED CLOUD COMBINING EDGE COMPUTING FOR IOT INFRASTRUCTURE 497

Jyoti Snehi, Manish Snehi, Devendra Prasad, Sarita Simaiya, Isha Kansal and Vidhu Baggan

14.1 Introduction 498

14.1.1 Architecture of SDN vs. Traditional Networks 503

14.1.2 SDN/NFV Tiers 504

14.1.3 Objective of Chapter 509

14.1.4 Organization of Chapter 509

14.2 Challenges with SDN-Based Cloud and NFV Technologies for IoT 510

14.3 Literature Survey 519

14.4 Knowledge-Driven SDN-Based IoT Architecture That Leverages Edge Cloud 526

14.5 Discussion and Future Recommendation 532

14.6 Conclusion 533

References 533

Index 541
Artikel-Details
Anbieter:
Wiley
Autor:
Anand Nayyar, Bhawna Singla, Preeti Nagrath
Artikelnummer:
9781119857914
Veröffentlicht:
06.06.2022
Seitenanzahl:
576